In Denmark, Companies Believe in Young People and Treat Them Accordingly
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In Denmark, Companies Believe in Young People and Treat Them Accordingly

THEY ARE GIVEN IMPORTANT POSITIONS AND ADEQUATE SALARIES RIGHT AWAY. BEATRICE GALET EXPLAINS THAT, IN SCANDINAVIA, THERE ARE GREAT OPPORTUNITIES FOR AMBITIOUS YOUNG EXECUTIVES

"Denmark is a well-organized, efficient country, with a high standard of living and short working hours which enable ample leisure and time for oneself. But above all, companies really believe in young people, so that they are given important responsibilities right away for jobs that are well paid."

Beatrice Galet is a 28-year-old from Sacile in Northeastern Italy and a Bocconi graduate of the BSc of Economics, Management and Finance. She is now manager at Mars, Incorporated in Copenhagen, where she is in charge of accounting and financial operations. "I manage a team of six people and we work on credit management, debt management and inter-company billing for Nordic countries (we operate over 20 factories in Europe), personnel compensation, and cost accounting. My job deals with business administration and control, but it is also teaching me a lot in terms of personal leadership and managing people."

For Beatrice, going abroad was not simply an opportunity, but the second step of a carefully planned career path: "At Bocconi I could breathe an international and stimulating atmosphere. I chose Northern Europe, because here it's easier to balance professional work with graduate studies. I did a Master in Business Management and Strategy in Copenhagen and found a job at a Danish multinational as a student financial controller. Then, at the company I currently work for, I was able to fill three different positions in three years (business analyst, supply finance analyst and finance data quality manager), each in a different country (Denmark, Holland and Poland), which has given me the opportunity to understand all aspects of business and develop important leadership skills."

At the moment, returning to Italy is not in the charts, but since "the future is a hypothesis," as an Italian pop song says, Beatrice does not want to forego the possibility, as long as her career keeps growing. "I want to continue to explore, live and work in countries where, by being different, I can make a difference and be enriched in the process. I want to be exposed to different cultures and lifestyles for my personal self-improvement, as I have done in recent years. One day, I would like to be able to return to Italy and bring back all that I have learned."

by Davide Ripamonti
Translated by Alex Foti


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